Relaxer Sales Decline 26%

 

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According to Mintel.com, relaxer/perm sales have declined 26% over the past five years. Undoubtedly this drop in sales is a result of an influx of women ditching relaxers and embracing their natural hair textures or locking their hair. But what does this mean for the black hair care industry? Well they either have the choice of hopping on the bandwagon and creating a natural hair care line or start promoting their relaxers heavily.

Recently I have seen perm companies split on this decision. Dark & Lovely, a notorious brand for relaxers has taken both routes. They have taken it upon themselves to start a natural hair care line as well as promo their ads on predominately black television stations. It is clear that they are taking these methods in order to fill their gap in sales.

On the contrary, Motions, another notorious brand for relaxers, has decided to only launch a new line of natural hair care products. We have yet to see any promotion from them about the relaxer line, so they are most likely hoping that their former loyal customers who used to buy their relaxers will try their natural hair care line.

The future of relaxers is looking dim, but I don’t think they will completely disappear anytime soon. As long as they keep implementing and preying on the insecurities of black women, I have a feeling these companies will still be in business years from now.

Creating Natural Hair Barbies

Finding barbies with natural hair is almost impossible, especially when we want our little girls to love and embrace their hair textures! Luckily, I found this video on how a woman changed her Barbie dolls hair from straight to kinky. Maybe you can do the same for your daughters doll.

Afros in Korea

ImageImageThe new trend in Korea is having kinky textured hair that resembles the hair type of Africans. I am not exactly sure how they are able to change their texture from bone straight to kinky, but it is being done. Many either wear their afros out, braid them into styles, wear dreadlocks or install box braids. The trend is also spreading to other Asian countries such as Japan.

But why is this a trend over seas? This makes me wonder why it is that kinky textured hair is more appreciated on the other side of the world than right here in America. Is it due to African presence being limited in Asian countries? Is the Afro/Asian culture from the Caribbean reaching Asian countries? Or is this a form of cultural appropriation?

If you wear dread locks, you need not apply

Image In the year 2014, it is still shocking to see that wearing dread locks in the workplace is still considered a taboo. A lot of people still view dread locks as unprofessional, or associate it with heavy drug use such as marijuana,

My purpose in posting about this is not to continue beating a dead horse, but to instead ask all of you readers a couple questions. Why is the way in which we wear our hair so important to others? How can we change the dynamics so that way every hair type can be accepted?

“I am not a Rastafarian”

dreadlocksI cannot speak for American culture, but I have noticed in West Indian culture, if a person chooses to wear dread locks, they are automatically a Rastafarian. For those who are unaware, a Rastafarian is a person who practices Rastafarianism, a religion originating in Jamaica. People who follow this religion abide by certain criteria such as wearing dreadlocks and refraining from consuming pork. In Jamaica, Rastafarians are rejected in society and are considered to be low class citizens. Because of this stigma, the majority of Jamaicans do not wear dreadlocks so they will not confused with Rastafarians.

Even with West Indians who have migrated to other parts of the world, the stigma of wearing dread locks still resignates with them. Many West Indians automatically consider a person who wears dreadlocks to either be dirty or poor and thus a Rastafarian.

As a member of the natural hair community, I have to defend my fellow brothers and sisters. I don’t believe that it is fair to pass judgement on the way in which a religious group or anyone decides to wear their hair. It is not fair to the religious group, nor to the individual. I understand that with old ways of thinking, it can be hard to break the stigma, but it is in no way excusable.

Are we ready for a first lady with natural hair?

Image No, the picture above is not real, it has been Photoshopped. However, with the recent rise in black women returning to their natural roots, the question of whether or not America is ready for a natural first lady comes into play.

It is no secret that when a black woman wears her natural hair, she is seen as militant, unkempt or unprofessional. Although the natural hair community is making strides to dispel this stigma, natural hair is still not widely accepted across America.

With the Obama family constantly under scrutiny about menial subjects, having a first lady who embraces her natural hair texture is not ideal. As depicted in The New Yorker in July of 2008, Michelle Obama was painted as a militant black panther with a terrorist husband. The fact that this magazine cover was allowed to be sold and was supported by many Americans leads me to believe that we are still in an age where having African features verses European features is unethical. Will America ever be ready to embrace a kinky textured first lady? That I am not sure of.

Take a look at this article on xojane.com to view the cover of The New Yorker that I referred to earlier.

Sorry Not Sorry

I’m not going to apologize for the topics I choose to write about and I’m also not going to change the topics of future content either. If you’re looking for a happy go lucky hair tip blog with sugar coated facts that everyone already knows about how to take care of natural hair then you’ve come to the wrong blog. The title of this blog is naturally UNAPOLOGETIC meaning that I am going to share my opinions on topics facing the natural hair community regardless of whether they are popular or not. Whether you choose to open your eyes to important issues affecting this natural hair ‘movement’ is up to your own willing but I’m not going to stop posting about them. If you do not like it, find another blog to read.